Jeff Madrick

Selected Reviews of Jeff Madrick's Books

Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Present

THE BUSTS KEEP GETTING BIGGER: WHY?
Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Present
By Paul Krugman and Robin Wells
Published: Sunday, July 14, 2011
New York Review of Books
The Age of Greed is a fascinating and deeply disturbing tale of hypocrisy, corruption, and insatiable greed. But more than that, it’s a much-needed reminder of just how we got into the mess we’re in—a reminder that is greatly needed when we are still being told that greed is good.

THE CASE FOR BIG GOVERNMENT
By Richard Parker
Published: Sunday, January 26, 2009
New York Review of Books
The extent to which Madrick's insightful and persuasive arguments will be taken up in US policy now rests to a large degree on whether President Obama and the Democrats can restore America's basic financial health. For the time being that means concentrating on government's ability first to save Wall Street and restore credit, and then to begin rebuilding the devastation Wall Street's failure has left behind. The challenge of creating a new era for government as long-term guarantor of our security and well-being lies ahead.

THE CASE FOR BIG GOVERNMENT 
By David Kusnet
Published: January 16, 2009
The New York Times
Before the financial crisis, most policy makers and opinion leaders smugly assumed that the economy would remain on an even keel, so Madrick felt he had to make a vigorous argument that economic problems required government action... 

To those who ask whether any country has ever taxed and spent its way to prosperity, Madrick offers two answers: the United States and its major competitors.

WHY ECONOMIES GROW
By John McMillan
Published: Sunday, January 26, 2003
The New York Times
While markets are the primary source of our prosperity, he argues in ''Why Economies Grow,'' we rely on the government as well. 


Myron Kandel
Published: Sunday, May 10, 1987
The New York Times
Madrick suggests that the takeover movement developed a momentum of its own, with corporate chief executives moving companies around as if they were pieces of a board game and managing - and discarding - businesses as if they were mere portfolios of stocks instead of living organizations with employees, traditions, products, customers and suppliers.